Upcoming Events

  • 28. Jun – 29. Jun 2016

    The European Refugee Crisis: Liberal Answers to Challenges on the Land

    Sofia
    Bulgaria
    Europe is faced with the largest influx of refugees and migrants since World War II. It is safe to say that migration is, and will be, one of the key challenges the European Union (EU) will be confronted with in the years to come - on a strategic, political, and moral level. This is why the ELF, together with FNF, offers a comprehensive series of workshops aiming to provide the fullest possible picture of the refugee crisis and its challenges – from initial registration in the Aegean to camps in Bulgaria and the seemingly ceaseless trek of refugees on the Balkan route
  • 30. Jun – 01. Jul 2016

    The European Refugee Crisis: Liberal Answers to Challenges on the Trek

    Belgrade
    Serbia
    Europe is faced with the largest influx of refugees and migrants since World War II. It is safe to say that migration is, and will be, one of the key challenges the European Union (EU) will be confronted with in the years to come - on a strategic, political, and moral level. This is why the ELF, together with FNF, offers a comprehensive series of workshops aiming to provide the fullest possible picture of the refugee crisis and its challenges – from initial registration in the Aegean to camps in Bulgaria and the seemingly ceaseless trek of refugees on the Balkan route
  • 04. Jul 2016

    ELF Ralf Dahrendorf Roundtable: Making Europe fit for our Generation

    Thessaloniki
    Greece
  • 04. Jul – 05. Jul 2016

    What's the Use of Europe? Euro - Greek Youth Dialogue

    Thessaloniki
    Greece
    As the latest Eurobarometer shows, only one out of four Greek citizens has a generally positive attitude towards the European Union (EU), whereas 37% see the EU as plain negative. Given the current state of affairs in Greece, this is not really surprising, but the common refusal of European integration goes deeper, and there are various reasons for this: Although having gained access to the EU in 1981, Greece for most of the time never shared a land border with another EU member state. The blessings of free movement of persons (and to a lesser degree also the free movement of goods) were never enjoyed by the majority of Greek citizens. Furthermore, young Greeks did not get as regularly into contact with fellow Europeans as their counterparts in other European countries. It is an open secret that participation in European exchange programs such as “Erasmus” was for a long time distributed along party lines. This goes hand in hand with the common perception of the EU as being a redistribution mechanism for few rather than an integral concept for peace, prosperity and stability for all Europeans. Both the conservative Nea Dimokratia as well as socialist PASOK never undertook any serious efforts to straighten this misconception and strengthen a European identity among their Greek countrymen. Despite facing severe problems which call for immediate action, Greece fights out ideological battles which have long been overcome in the rest of Europe. This is especially true for Greek universities which until today are highly politicized and oftentimes the venue for fierce clashes between left and right wing groups. In such an environment, liberal voices of reason promoting the manifold benefits of European integration have a hard time penetrating public discourse.

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